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It's important to know that hormone
therapy today is not the same as your
mother's hormone therapy.
A lot has changed over the years
To understand hormone therapy (also called HT), you must understand its evolution. A lot has changed over the years. As with all scientific fields, the medical field is ever changing. Understanding of hormone therapy within the medical community has changed dramatically in a short amount of time. But in the end, we are constantly moving toward better healthcare and better treatment options.
Lower doses, shorter time
Today, we know that hormone therapy carries the least amount of risk when used for the shortest time at the lowest effective dose. But there is so much to know about hormone therapy to help you understand how we got here. This section of the website will help you sift through the mountain of information—from understanding what hormone therapy means to knowing how to find the most accurate and current information about it on the web.
Read on for answers:
What is hormone therapy?
How hormone therapy has evolved
Weighing the options
Finding reliable information
Important Safety Information
What is the most important information I should know about EVAMIST (an estrogen hormone)?

Using estrogen-alone may increase your chance of getting cancer of the uterus (womb). Report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away while you are using EVAMIST. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the uterus (womb). Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find the cause.

Do not use estrogen-alone to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, strokes or dementia (decline of brain function).

Using estrogen-alone may increase your chances of getting strokes or blood clots.

Using estrogen-alone may increase your chance of getting dementia, based on a study of women 65 years or older.

Do not use estrogens with progestins to prevent heart disease, heart attack or dementia.

Using estrogens with progestins may increase your chances of getting heart attacks, strokes, breast cancer, or blood clots.

Using estrogens with progestins may increase your chance of getting dementia, based on a study of women 65 years and older.

You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with EVAMIST.

The estrogen in EVAMIST (estradiol transdermal spray) spray can transfer from the area of skin where it was sprayed to other people. Do not allow others, especially children, to come into contact with the area of your skin where you sprayed EVAMIST. Young children who are accidentally exposed to estrogen through contact with women using EVAMIST (estradiol transdermal spray) may show signs of puberty that are not expected (for example, breast budding).


EVAMIST (estradiol transdermal spray) is an estrogen hormone used after menopause to reduce moderate to severe hot flashes.

Evamist should not be used if you have unusual vaginal bleeding; currently have or have had certain cancers, including cancer of the breast or uterus; had a stroke or heart attack year; currently have or have had blood clots; currently have or have had liver problems; have been diagnosed with a bleeding disorder; are allergic to EVAMIST or any of its ingredients; or think you may be, or know that you are, pregnant.

The most common side effects that may occur with Evamist are headache, breast pain, irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting, stomach or abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting, hair loss, fluid retention, and vaginal yeast infection.

Please see full patient information for EVAMIST.

Please see full prescribing information for EVAMIST, including boxed warnings.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

 
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